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  • Marilia Chamon

Spring Buddha Bowl

A low FODMAP recipe that packs over 10 different plant foods, lots of fibre, protein and flavour!


Recipe by Deb Fabris


Serves 2-3


Ingredients


½ cup uncooked quinoa

1 tbsp garlic infused olive oil

½ cup canned chickpeas

½ tsp smoked paprika

½ tsp cumin

Broccoli, chopped

Purple cabbage, thinly sliced

Avocado, thinly sliced

Cherry tomatoes, chopped

Yellow pepper, chopped

Radish, thinly sliced

Lemon wedges, to serve

Crushed peanuts, to serve

Spring onions (green parts only), to serve


For the spicy peanut butter sauce:

¼ cup peanut butter

½ tbsp sriracha

½ tbsp tamari sauce

1 tsp sesame oil

1 tsp maple syrup

1 ½ tbsp water, to thin



Method:

  • Using a strainer, rinse the quinoa under running water. Add it to a pot along with 1 cup of water. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer until all the water is absorbed. Turn off the heat and keep the pot covered with a lid for 10-20 minutes. Fluff with a fork before serving.

  • Taking advantage of the boiling water, lightly steam the broccoli by placing a steaming basket over your pot. This is multitasking at its finest!

  • To make the crispy chickpeas, add garlic infused oil to a fry pan along with smoked paprika, cumin and chickpeas. Salt and pepper to taste. Keep the heat on medium but make sure to pop a lid on top of the pan as chickpeas tend to pop when they're hot! Stir often to make sure they don’t burn and they will start to develop a crunchy skin in 10-15 minutes which is the same it will take for the quinoa to cook.

  • While you wait for your quinoa and veggies to cook, chop and slice your chosen raw veggies.

  • To make the spicy peanut butter sauce simply mix peanut butter, sriracha, tamari sauce, sesame oil, maple syrup and water in a bowl.

  • Once all of your ingredients are ready, assemble your bowl. You can serve this warm or cold. Enjoy!



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